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Gyōza aka Pot Stickers

February 21, 2011

I’ve looked and looked and cannot find the recipe I used to follow when I first started making gyōza . I thought it would be fun to post it as it was another one of my culinary adventurous’ Mothers’ well-before-you-could-buy-them-frozen specialties back in the 1970’s. She would keep frozen batches ready to cook at a moment’s notice. Since I can’t give you the original, I’m giving you the recipe I’ve been making for years. Having grown up eating these, pre-made wonton wrappers were one of the items I’d make room for in my suitcase on return trips to Italy. Ground cumin, a few packages of flour and corn tortillas, peanut butter and York peppermint patties all kept company with the wrappers and they were a comfort when I was missing home. Knowing that when I needed a break from what was otherwise some of the freshest ingredients for anything Italian, I could whip up some of these tasty pot stickers by having the wrappers at the ready. I did try to make them from scratch and said “never again”. Some goyza have thicker dough but these are light because of the thinness of the store-bought wrappers. I made them recently for a dinner with The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pans where “healthy” was the theme.

Turkey Pot Stickers with dipping sauce

Ingredients for about 50 pieces

  • 1 package pre-made wonton skins
  • 1  pound ground lean turkey or chicken
  • 3/4 cup finely ground carrots
  • 1  1/2″ knob ginger or about 1 Tbsp finely minced
  • 3 cloves garlic or about 1 Tbsp finely minced
  • 4 scallions, white and half the greens, finely minced
  • 2 Tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp rice wine vinegar

Method:

Place ground turkey/chicken in a  bowl, set aside. Using a food processor, finely mince garlic, scallions and ginger and carrots. Add to meat mixture along with sauces and vinegar. Mix well. Set up a work station with a shallow dish of water, towel for drying your hands, cookie sheet lined with wax or parchment paper, the filling mixture and wonton wrappers. Lay 4 wrappers out at a time covering the rest while you fill and shape those 4. Place a scant tablespoon of filling in the center of each wrapper. Wet the edges of the wrappers by dipping a finger in the water and tracing the edges. Working on one at a time, bring opposite points of the wrapper to form a triangle. Turn the triangle to set the filled edge down while sealing the two sides. Once they are stuck together, gently crimp the triangle bringing the corner points up and pushing lightly so the bottom flattens out. This will be the surface that browns and “sticks to the pan” and is then released during the second step of the cooking process when they are steamed. Move the completed pot sticker to the lined baking sheet and repeat the steps on the next one. I’ve found that by laying out 4 skins at a time is an efficient way to make about 50 dumplings in about 30 minutes. Either cook them within a few hours of making or cover with plastic wrap and freeze solid. They can then be stored in a plastic bag and pulled out to cook as desired.

Whether cooking fresh or frozen, heat a well oiled skillet placing pot stickers about a half-inch apart. Allow to cook until bottoms are well browned. Pick one up to check doneness. Pour enough hot water or stock to cover the bottom of the pan but not so the dumplings are swimming. Cover and allow to steam for about 5 minutes. Add more liquid as needed so there is always steam being created and pan doesn’t dry out and burn the bottoms taking care not to have much if any liquid left once they are cooked. Remove from pan and sever with dipping sauce immediately. We often have these with steamed broccoli or stir fried vegetables.

You won’t be buying these frozen once you’ve tried these – promise.

Dipping Sauce

Mix all of these ingredients and serve with hot gyōza

  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp chili paste or a few shakes of Sriracha (if you like a little heat)
  • 1 tsp oyster sauce
  • 1/2 tsp minced garlic
  • 1/2 tsp minced ginger
  • 1 scallion, minced

Place a scant tablespoon of filling in the center of each wrapper. Wet the edges of the wrappers by dipping a finger in the water and tracing the edge.

 Working on one at a time, bring opposite points of the wrapper to form a triangle. Turn the triangle to set the filled edge down while sealing the two sides

Once the sides are sealed, gently crimp the triangle bringing the corner points up and pushing lightly so the bottom flattens out

Whether cooking fresh or frozen, heat a well oiled skillet placing pot stickers about a half-inch apart. Allow to cook until bottoms are well browned. 

 

Pour enough hot water or stock to cover the bottom of the pan but not so the dumplings are swimming. Cover and allow to steam for about 5 minutes

Enjoy with dipping sauce and serve with stir-fried veggies or steamed broccoli

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12 Comments leave one →
  1. Cathy Brereton permalink
    February 22, 2011 7:23 am

    My kids all love these! I may have to try these. They seem fairly easy to make and the kids would actually love to make them with me. Thx for these posts Amy. I love them!

  2. February 22, 2011 7:39 am

    Cathy – They are super easy despite the long explantion… and SO much better than the store bought ones. It’s perfect for kids to help with. Sarah used to help me and we’d whip a batch out in 15 mintues. So worth the efffort. Thanks for reading!
    Amy

  3. Carolynne Paul permalink
    February 22, 2011 10:09 am

    Nice recipe! Made fresh from home, these are the hands-down winners in any contest with store-bought frozen gyoza. My recipe uses the same great ingredients that make this a standout–garlic, fresh ginger, and green onions–but instead of ground turkey I use minced and whole tiny cocktail shrimp and I add finely chopped pieces of water chestnut for crunch and texture. Also good with ponzu sauce, a citrussy Japanese dipping sauce.

    • February 22, 2011 8:09 pm

      Carolynne – these sound great. Love the idea of shrimp and though I’m not a fan of water chestnuts, they’d be a great added crunch. I’ll try this next time I make a batch. Thanks for reading and for the great ideas.

  4. February 22, 2011 10:29 am

    Looks tasty. My daughter loves pot stickers but I don’t usually get them because they’re not too healthy. I like the idea of making our own healthier (leaner) filling , decreasing the carbs with a thinner wrapper, and being able to control how much oil we use for frying. So many fun foods are not particularly healthy or calorie-conscious. It’s great to have tasty alternatives that a parent can feel good about serving up.

    • February 22, 2011 8:10 pm

      Jackie – she might have fun making them with you too… totally doable for kids. I used to make them with my daughter all the time.

  5. Kim Allen permalink
    February 22, 2011 10:39 pm

    Kim Allen From one of the least likely results, my mother has two recipes. For you and whoever else wants to go on a culinary adventure. Here goes. I’ll start with my mothers favorite and then the other.
    48 Potstickers
    2 cups finely shredded cabba…ge
    1 tsp. salt
    1 cup ground Pork
    3 Tab. water + 1/2 tsp. of salt
    1 cup minced Shrimp
    1 egg beaten
    1 1/2 Tab. Soy Sauce
    1 chopped green onion
    1 Tab. oil
    Place shredded cabbage and 1 tsp salt in bowl for 10 minutes.
    Squeeze out water and save.
    Combine pork and 1/2 tsp. salt and water squeezed from cabbage.
    Add the rest of the ingredients.
    Place dab of mixture in center of potsticker dough. Seal edges by placeing water along the edges.
    Dust pan with corn starch and fry until the bottoms are brown.
    Add 1/4 to 1/3 cup of water to pan and cover for 5 minutes.
    Uncover and refry.

    48 Potstickers (round) cut in 4 pieces
    3/4 lb. ground pork
    2 Tab. soy sauce
    1 chopped green onion
    3/4 lb. Cabbage
    1 tsp salt
    1 Tab. oil
    1 egg
    Cook whole cabbage in 4 cups boiling water for 2 minutes.
    Chop cabbage fine.
    Mix all other ingredients.
    Place dab of mixture in center of potsticker dough. Seal by dabbing
    water along the edges.
    Place potstickers in pan with 1 Tab. oil and brown on the bottoms.
    Add 1/3 cup of water and cook an additional 5-6 minutes in pan until steamed.

    • February 23, 2011 8:25 pm

      THANK YOU KIM – These are 2 of the variations my Mom used to make.. excited to try them.

  6. February 24, 2011 10:07 pm

    I make potstickers with turkey too! Love it! But definitely worth a trip to the local asian market to pick up frozen round gyoza wrappers. They are thinner and make a more delicate potsticker, I think. I buy a lot since they keep in the freezer for months. I’ll try your dipping sauce…sounds perfect. I found your blog through a mutual friend. Thanks!

    • February 24, 2011 10:18 pm

      I’ve used the gyoza wrappers too and liked them. Thanks for looking at my blog. John and I work together and he forwarded it to you and Elizabeth today so you are fast! I saw some of the soups you made while we were looking at your blog at his desk. I will look more tomorrow. He said you’re in NC, I think? I spent many vacations in Chapel Hill, what a beautiful state. Two people commented with other very good sounding recipes for potstickers that I’m going to try as I’m pretty sure they are similar to ones my Mom made when I was growing up. The sauce is tasty and keeps well in the fridge. Amy

Trackbacks

  1. Traveling Pans, Healthy Hearts « eating bender
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